Jobs with the Worst Outlook in 2015

  • Unhappy at Work

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that employment is projected to increase by 10.8 percent between 2012 and 2022, with healthcare industries adding the most new jobs. That means a good job market for candidates newly graduating from college and mid-level career changers alike. There are plenty of jobs, however, that don’t have such a great outlook.

According to CareerCast, a premier Internet career site and Jobs Rated Report publisher, changing technology and difficult or dangerous working conditions make the following jobs the worst for 2015 job seekers.

Newspaper Reporter

Not many people actually sit down to read the Sunday paper anymore.  When the latest news can be accessed at the click of an icon and on the go, sitting down with a pound of paper just to get front page headlines, latest weather, and funny pages seems tedious and out of touch.  The technology that’s moving the news from print publications to the Internet and mobile devices means smaller revenues and fewer hires.

Lumberjack

Fortunately, not many people are majoring in lumberjack work in college.  This career can be dangerous and isolating. In addition, technical advances in the industry have contributed to more automated processes.  Therefore, hiring is down and at the mercy of volatile marketplaces for the wood these employees harvest.

Enlisted Military Personnel

A military career is challenging and all-consuming, with hardship, stress, and danger on the daily agenda. Regimented lifestyles are difficult to adjust to, and not everyone is able to adjust. Growth in this position is expected to remain about the same, but the job rates low in areas of income and stress.

Cook

Cooks have to contend with the chaotic kitchen environment, kitchen staff, and customers. They need to have culinary talent, management abilities, and customer service skills. Even though celebrity chefs make for popular TV viewing, there is limited growth for this position and the everyday cook job is not rated highly.

Broadcaster

Broadcaster jobs are becoming fewer and farther between because of a much more competitive media environment.  Many outlets are also opting for syndicated content.  With fewer full-time jobs, high stress, and low salaries, it’s easy to understand why this makes the list of jobs with the worst outlooks in 2015.

Other Worst Jobs

Other jobs that made CareerCast’s report on the worst jobs in 2015 include photojournalist, corrections officer, taxi driver, firefighter, and mail carrier. These jobs have been impacted by poor and unfavorable working conditions, advances in technology, low salaries, or all the above.

Forbes’ Jenna Goudreau reports that computer operators, stage performers, postal mail sorters, office and administrative support workers, telemarketers and door-to-door salespeople, and photo processors are all dead or dying career paths because of technology. The worst careers today commonly pay poorly and require danger or high stress. The best jobs, according to CareerCast publisher Tony Lee, involve math, pay better, and are less stressful. Mathematician, actuary, and statistician are all occupations growing faster than the average for all occupations, at 23 percent, 26 percent, and 27 percent respectively.

If you have jobs with the worst outlook at your company, you’ll have to work a little harder to attract and recruit workers. Human Capital Management (HCM) technology can make it easier to engage employees, improve productivity, and streamline payroll and HR processes so employees and management are happier and able to work together better. The added benefits of security and efficiency make it even more cost-effective to use HCM.




iSolved



Categories

About the Author:

As Director of Operations, Jessica oversees the day-to-day operations for payroll, human resources, tax, finance and client affairs. She also plays an active role in formulating corporate strategy and developing client programs.

Jessica believes a company’s success begins with its people. She strives to build a team encompassing excellence and professionalism, and to play a large role in developing the staff on an ongoing basis. Her passion for strong client relationships drives her in ensuring that clients receive the highest level of personal service and the best products in the industry.

Jessica joined PAYDAY in 2004, and quickly advanced to Development Coordinator in 2006, when she took charge of Human Resources. She was promoted to Director of Operations in September, 2011.

Google